Pages

3/20/20

The Lion Boy Trilogy

Author: Zizou Corder

Genre: Dystopian

Age: MG

POV: 1st person

Book One: Lion Boy

Summary: Set in the near future, Charlie is a boy who can talk to cats. His parents are top scientist. One day Charlie comes home to find out his parents have been kidnapped. Stealing away on a circus ship, Charlie befriends a pride of lions. Can Charlie help the lions escape and find his parents in time?  
Review of book one: Charlie is smart and tries to think things through. Even those it may not go as plan. I like how there are some scenes of Charlie's parents showing how they are dealing with being kidnapped and being away from their son. It gives more depth and a bigger role to play in the story. There are some scenes of Rafi looking for Charlie.

The writing is good. There is some detailed description of the circus and the performers. It makes you feel like your right there watching the circus.

The whole book captures the fun and whimsical spirit of running away with the circus. While it has that, it also has a serious undertone. Dealing with losing your parents and having to find them, pushes the limits of being a kid and growing up.

The weird lion creature that shows up near the end kind of feels out of place. I don’t where they're going with this. Hopefully, the second book clears it up.

Book Two: The Chase


Summary: Continuing were the story last left off Charlie and the lions are offer a safe haven that feel like a prison. He lion have been separated from him and he doesn’t know who to trust. As Rafi and Maccomo close in on Charlie, he finds a way to continue his journey and find out the truth behind the sinister scheme that’s threatening everything he loves. 

Review: The non-stop action of the story kept right on moving into the second book. I like how Charlie is shown to be smart and with the help of the cats he able to figure stuff out. I didn’t think he will let the lions go. After all, they have been through it heartbreaking.

Like the first book their a switch in viewpoint however, I was listening to the audiobook and it got confusing when viewpoints switch. I will be listening to Charlie and then listening to Charlie’s parents without knowing.

I wouldn’t recommend the audio. Well, its plays the music that is shown as music sheets throughout the book. There are some nice pictures as well.

I like how the plotline of Charlie looking for his permeants ends in this book. That way the third book can wrap up the other side plots.
Book Three: The Truth

The TruthSummary: After months of searching, not to mention leading a pride of escaped circus lions through Europe and all the way back to Africa, Catspeaker Charlie Ashanti has finally been reunited with his parents--and a long-lost relative with a huge secret to reveal. But their family reunion doesn't last long. Kidnapped and thrown in a boat, Charlie finds himself alone and bound for who knows where. Charlie's parents and his faithful lion friends are in hot pursuit, but can Charlie outwit his captor and topple the Corporacy's wicked enterprise? That's the plan, and Charlie intends to pull it off--no matter the cost. 

Review: The whole book moves fast with a lot of action. Giving the series a satisfying ending. I like all the characters and the loins have more of a role in this book.

The Lion Boy trilogy is great, and I give it five stars. I will say it does fall in the middle grade category. The adults do try to help and are seen as people with flaws. Making it ground it in reality. However, everything comes back to Charlie solving mostly everything. He is shown to be smart at outwitting everyone. However, the problem solving could have been even out between everyone else.
 
Points for the Whole Series:

Characters:5/5

Writing: 5/5

Plot: 5/5

Total: 15/20

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